Support

FAQs - Memory

  • How do I correctly install desktop memory?
  • How do I install my new notebook memory module?
  • Why is the memory I installed off by a couple of megabytes?
    The video adapter in your computer system can impact memory read out by as much as 8MB. Your system may subtract memory depending on where the video memory is located (For example, on the motherboard).
  • After I install a new memory module, why can’t I get the computer to see the total amount?
    Take all of the memory out of the system. Then install one memory module at a time, removing the one before it, to make sure that each module will boot the system and register the full amount if memory. Then install them together to make sure that they will be compatible with each other. The process is the best way to ensure that each module is compatible with the system as well as with each other.
  • My System will not reboot after I installed a new memory module, what should I do?
    Verify that you have the correct memory module for your system.
    The new memory module(s) may not be compatible with your system. The newer memory modules are being manufactured with high density IC’s (little black chips). They now come with 8 (on one side), 4 (on each side) or 8 (on each side). The design inside of the IC’s on the Memory Modules may be too complex for your system to read and it may not work in your system.
    Make sure that the memory is seated properly in the computer socket with both clips locking on their own.
    Verify that the addition of the module does not exceed the memory capacity of your computer.
    Test each module in the system to see which is defective by performing the following procedure for each memory module:
    A: Shut down your system
    B: Remove all the memory modules from your system.
    C: Insert one memory module at a time and boot the system up to ensure its compatibility
    D: After each module is successfully tested insert all modules into the system and boot up.
    NOTE: Place the highest memory module closest to the processor and work down.
    If you have identified a defective module, return the memory module to the retailer (vendor) where you purchased it for an exchange. If the exchange date has expired, then contact PNY to obtain a Returned Merchandise Authorization (RMA) number.
  • How can I get a defective Memory card replaced or refunded?
    PNY Technologies will honor its products warranty. Refunds, however, are done on the retail level based on the individual store’s return/exchange policies. If the Memory module is defective in any way we will gladly exchange it for you, please click here to contact technical support to obtain an RMA (Return Authorization Number).***NOTE: No returns will be processed without an RMA number. For further informations about guarantee policy, click here.
  • Why does my system only see 25% or 50% of the total memory installed?
    Older (Pre 1999) systems may require an older memory module design that PNY and most other manufacturers no longer make. Some of these modules are still available, but they are not generally easy to find. The modules that we now manufacture use a high-density construction. These new modules will not work properly in your older system. If you have already purchased a module, and that module is not working in your system, return the module to the store where you purchased it within the time of the return policy.
  • Can I add more RAM memory to my system if I already have the maximum amount installed?
    Though some motherboards can handle an amount in excess of the amount that each slot will handle, to gain the best performance from your system, we recommend that you install only the maximum amount each slot is designed to accommodate. To determine the maximum amount of memory that your system can accommodate, divide the total amount of system memory (this information can be found in your owner’s manual) by the number of slots on the motherboard. For example, if your motherboard can only accommodate a maximum of 384MB RAM and the Motherboard has 3 slots, each slot should take only a maximum of 128MB. This should insure that you get the best performance from your system with regard to RAM memory.
  • Where can I find out which memory module is compatible with my system?
    Visit PNY’s website configurator to select the right memory for your system by make and model.
  • Why is my system not listed in your Configurator?
    If your system is not listed on PNY’s configurator, this means that either you have a older (Pre 1999) system and we have discontinued the product or that we have not tested/qualified memory for you specific system model.
  • What is ESD and why is it important?
    ESD stands for Electrostatic Discharge. Static electricity is the energy found in the air surrounding us and can damage electronic components in computers hard disk drive, floppy disk drive, memory modules, motherboards etc. To protect memory modules from being damaged by ESD, always keep an electronic component in its anti-static package until you are ready to install it. For an added measure of protection, use an anti-static wrist strap, which can be found almost in every electronic retail store.
  • Do DIMM memory modules have to be installed in pairs?
    No, DIMMs are designed as 64-Bits-wide; therefore, there is no need to install them in pairs in Pentium or equivalent systems. However, in some systems such as professionals worstations, DIMMs kits might be required. Visit PNY’s website configurator to select the right memory for your system by make and model.
  • How can I tell if the new memory I installed is working?

    On an IBM Compatible PC:

    Go to the “My Computer” icon and right click on it Select “Properties” from the menu (at the bottom) Select the “General” Tab Look towards the bottom of the page under “Computer”. It will list the RAM being recognized by the system. You should see a combined total of what you had before installing the new module + the amount of memory you just installed. (Example: 32MB + 64MB = 96MB.) However this also may vary a bit due to video memory that could use up to 8MB of memory. OR Select the “Performance” tab Look for the available RAM Memory On a Macintosh: To check on how much memory a Mac has: Choose “About This Macintosh” (“About the Finder” under System 6) from the Apple menu when you are on the desktop (or Finder) and look at the total memory figure.
  • I installed a new memory module and my system will not reboot, even with the original memory installed by itself. What should I do?
    1. Verify you have the correct memory module for your system by going to our online system configurator. 2. The new memory module(s) may not be compatible with your system. The newer memory modules are manufactured with high density IC’s (little black chips). They now come with 8 (on one side), 4 (on each side) or 8 (on each side). The design inside of the IC’s on the Memory Modules may be too complex for your system to read and it may not work in your system. 3. Make sure the memory is seated properly in the computer socket with both clips locking on their own. 4. Verify the addition of the module does not exceed the memory capacity of your computer. 5. Test each module in the system to see which is defective by performing the following procedure for each memory module: Shut down your system Remove all the memory modules from your system. Insert one memory module at a time and boot the system up to ensure its compatibility After each module is successfully tested insert all modules into the system and boot up. NOTE: Place the highest memory module closest to the processor and work down. 6. If you have identified a defective module, return the memory module to the retailer (vendor) where you purchased it for an exchange. If the exchange date has expired, then contact PNY to obtain a Returned Merchandise Authorization (RMA) number.
  • Is your memory compatible with MAC firmware Upgrades?
    Some older PNY memory modules are not compatible with the MAC firmware upgrade. The MAC firmware update problem is a result of the release of the MAC OS X operating system firmware updates (4.1.7, 4.1.8 and later releases) Please click here to call PNY technical support to request an RMA number.
  • Why did my modem stop working after installing new memory? (While using Win9X/ME and having more than 512MB)
    The problem you are experiencing is an address mapping conflict between the system BIOS and the modem. At 512MB the system will try to map the memory and that will affect the modem. This resource mapping issue can only be corrected by re-mapping the memory for the modem. Contact your system manufacturer to obtain assistance with this critical system issue. Please note: If the problem is not corrected according to manufacturer’s instructions, your system may halt and not reboot.
  • My computer has both SIMM and DIMM sockets on its motherboard. Can my computer support both formats at the same time?
    No, you can not mix SIMM and DIMM modules on the same system. The best information is available from the system or motherboard manufacturer. If the board cannot support both formats, then a 5volt SIMM or a 3.3volt DIMM will work.
  • Why does my new memory module fail the Norton memory test? (Systems with more than 256MB)
    There is a known BUG in Norton Utilities. Please click here to apply the fix that may correct the addressing error. SECTION 6 talks about the reason Norton’s memory test fails.
  • What information should I provide / have ready when I e-mail / call in for help?
    Here is a quick checklist of important information we will need to assist you. The make and model of your system The make and model of the motherboard in the system (If your system was built for you) The information is provided on the white label on the memory module itself.
  • Why do I get a Serial Presence Detect (SPD) error when I try to boot up?
    This message indicates at some point during installation the new memory module came in contact with an electrostatic charge that may have caused damage to the EEPROM chip of the module. Return the defective module to the retailer within the return policy time frame. If the return policy time frame has expired, click here to contact PNY for a Return Merchandise Authorization (RMA) form.
  • Should I upgrade my BIOS to gain more memory?
    Please consult your PC manufacturer for more information regarding BIOS upgrades.
  • Why does my computer show low system resources after I install more memory?
    Click here for an explanation on System Resources, and how they relate to RAM memory.
  • Why did my computer slow down after I installed more RAM?
    In most cases, adding RAM improves system performance. However, if you are using Windows 95/98/ME there a cap on the total amount of memory Windows can handle. Click here for more information:
  • What does ECC mean and what is it used for?
    ECC stands for Error Correcting Code. It is also referred to as parity memory. ECC is more advanced than non-parity because it can detect both multiple-bit errors and single-bit errors; while non-parity memory only detects single-bit errors. ECC is typically found in higher-end PC’s and file servers where data integrity is key.
  • What is CAS Latency and how does it work?
    CAS Latency (also referred to as CL or simply latency) is the amount of time it takes for your memory to respond to a command. Specifically, it is the length of time between memory receiving a command to read data, and the first piece of data being output from memory. Latency is measured in terms of clock cycles and is often noted as CL2 (two clock cycles) or CL3 (three clock cycles). CL2 parts process data a little quicker than CL3 parts as it takes one clock cycle less for the initial data to be processed. However, after the first piece of data is processed, the rest of the data is processed at equal speeds. Latency only affects the initial burst of data. Once data starts flowing, there is no difference in processing speed. Please note, a clock cycle for a PC100 module is 10 nanoseconds so you probably won't notice a significant performance difference. Most systems will accept either latency part. However, there are some systems that will require either CL2 or CL3 parts.